What is Ballot Issue 4B? What is SCFD?

 

Vote Yes on Colorado 4B and SCFD If you’re like me and you read about 4B in the Analysis of the 2016 Ballot Proposals booklet, you’re now totally confused about what it is and what SCFD does. You may have seen the Yes on 4B yard signs – the ones with the polar bear. You may even have seen Popsicle the SCFD polar bear mascot walking around town.

But all of that doesn’t mean much if you can’t translate the legal jargon from the booklet. So here’s a quick rundown of what SCFD and Colorado 4B really are and why they are so critical this election. In other words, why you should absolutely vote YES on 4B.

What is SCFD?

SCFD stands for Scientific & Cultural Facilities District. It is funded by a sales tax of one cent on every $10. It is currently in its 28th year.

Where does the money go?

SCFD supports museums like the Denver Museum of Nature and Science and the Children’s Museum, the Denver Zoo, orchestras like the Parker Symphony Orchestra, the Colorado Ballet, and other educational, scientific, and visual and performing arts programs throughout Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Denver, Douglas, and Jefferson counties. If you’ve been to any of these, you’ve benefited from SCFD. Attended an orchestra concert or an opera performance? That was funded at least in part by SCFD. Took the family to a Free Day at Four Mile Historic Park or the Denver Art Museum? That was made possible by SCFD. And all for only 1 penny of every $10 you spend!

Counties served by SCFD

What is 4B?

The sales tax of 1 cent on every $10 to fund SCFD is set to expire in 2018. A vote of YES on ballot issue 4B will reauthorize the funds until 2030 and residents of the 7 counties can continue to experience amazing programs and events for years to come – sometimes for free. A vote of Yes will be a vote to continue to bring culture to all.

Why is Yes on SCFD so important?

SCFD helps organizations in the Denver metro area continue to provide educational and cultural programs to everyone. From Free Days to field trips to special events and exhibits, organizations large and small, SCFD brings culture to all.

It has helped the Parker Symphony purchase instruments, rent and purchase sheet music for concerts like our Music of John Williams performance, and bring in special soloists and performers.

SCFD also generates $1.8 billion annually in economic activity and $520 million in tourism and creates 10,731 jobs. It has served 4.5 million students and 14 million guests.

It has elevated the Denver metro area to a world‐class cultural center with 95% growth in attendance since the district began.

Please vote YES on 4B on November 8 and help us keep the music playing! Learn more at Yes on SCFD.

Rene Conducting the Parker Symphony Orchestra

 

What Is A Symphony?

Parker Symphony Orchestra

Even if you’re not a classical music fan, you’ve probably heard a symphony or two. You may not know the names or composers, but symphonies have been featured in everything from commercials to cartoons and they are a staple in classical music.

The Symphony Defined

There are two ways to define symphony. One definition refers to a symphony orchestra, a group of musicians who perform symphonies among other works. If a friend says, “I went to the symphony last night,” they mean they went to hear an orchestra.

A symphony is also a musical work, and a great one at that. It has multiple parts called movements separated by a brief pause. The audience does not applaud between movements. One basic format is a brisk and lively first movement followed by a slow and lyrical second movement, a dancing third movement, and a virtuosic finale. There are many variations on this, however. The form has been around for more than 300 years, but it has evolved greatly over the centuries. While symphonies in the 1700’s held to a more standardized format, those of the 1800’s and beyond began to include non-traditional elements like soloists and choruses. They can also vary in the number movements. Many symphonies have 4 movements. Some have 3.

The Symphony Today

What does all of this mean for you, the listener? It means that symphonies offer something for everyone. They have a variety of tempos and styles that naturally keep you engaged. In just one piece, you can be whipped into a frenzy by a robust motif, whisked away by a lyrical melody, and inspired and amazed by a grand theme. Symphonies are actually a journey. Like a book with chapters or a play with acts, the symphony takes you through very different parts that all combine to create a satisfying whole.

Symphonies are also incredibly listenable. They offer a way to escape the everyday. They evoke images and inspire emotions. They reveal the depths of the composers’ musical thinking without telling you what to think. They give you the freedom the feel and think whatever you want based on what you are hearing.

Examples Of Great Symphonies

Since the 18th century, many composers, certainly most of the famous names, have written at least one symphony. Beethoven, Schubert, and Dvorak wrote 9. Haydn wrote no fewer than 107. Below is a list of some well-known and beloved works.

Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 (‘From The New World’)

Beethoven – Symphony No. 5

Mozart – Symphony No. 25

Mendelssohn – Symphony No. 4 (‘Italian’)

Brahms – Symphony No. 4

Beethoven – Symphony No. 9 (‘Choral’)

Franck – Symphony in D Minor

Saint Saëns – Symphony No. 3 (‘Organ’)

Haydn – Symphony No. 94 (‘Surprise’)

Schubert – Symphony No. 8 (‘Unfinished’)